For Sleep but Sleepless in Lake Arrowhead, California

For the past week, I have been residing in high altitude at the UCLA-owned resort of Lake Arrowhead, California in the San Bernardino Forest (and mountains) near LA. I was attending a scientific and professional development workshop devoted to sleep research, grantsmanship, responsible conduct of research, and networking. The theme of the workshop was “translational […]

Galen may have been (partly) right.

You may recall learning bits and pieces of ancient psychiatric history in some physiology or psychology course. I am referring to the four temperaments proposed by Galen who believed that four bodily fluids were uniquely responsible for some aspect of human behavior: blood, bile, black bile, and phlegm. After Galen, the medical and psychiatric community […]

It’s Crossfit Games Week: #Pandanation, #AllBridgers, and #Jetlag

Years worth of training, competition, and trust come to fruition this weekend as my teammate, training partner, and friend competes for the title “Fittest on Earth.”  I’ve talked about the Crossfit Games and the journey that it takes to get there many times before. Last year, I had the opportunity to compete on a team […]

SRBR 2014: Big Sky, Montana

Conference season continued this month with a week-long trip to the West Coast for the biennial Society for Research on Biological Rhythms meeting which was held in a new location: Big Sky, Montana. Words and pictures cannot describe the serenity and natural beauty of this place. During the many hikes that we took throughout the […]

Daylight Savings is a Public Health Concern. Who is responsible? The circadian system or sleep homeostat?

This isn’t new news. For years, public health officials have forewarned us about the increased risks for car accidents, workplace accidents, and immediate declines in cardiovascular and neurological health following the springing forward. Nearly all of these studies attribute the connection between DST and changes in health risks to an hour of sleep loss because […]

Measuring Elite Fitness, Part 3

For regular readers, you may recall that I have been involved with a multi-part study of elite Crossfitters. The research enterprise continued last week when I did a very challenging (and my first) test of VO2 max. One would think that elite Crossfitters have cardiac and respiratory output that rivals that of elite endurance athletes […]

Highlights from the Gordon Conference on Sleep Regulation

I have been idle the past week because I have been in Galveston, TX for a secret society meeting of sleep researchers. It wasn’t really secret, but it was an invite only conference limited to less than 200 participants worldwide. The focus of the meeting was the neural mechanisms of sleep, namely those studied in […]

UPDATE 3: PREDICTING REGIONAL COMPETITORS FROM SINGLE OPEN RESULTS

More from my studious husband…. Here’s another contribution to my analyses of the CrossFit Open competition, and is continued from here, where I looked broadly at maximum and minimum placings among Open competitors,  and here, where I examined the frequency that athletes finished within the top 60 of a given Open workout and how that related to qualification for Regionals. […]

Refueling during the Crossfit Open: A Physiologist’s Perspective

The Reebok Crossfit Open simultaneously brings out the best and worst in me. I enjoy the physiological onslaught of pain and fatigue a few minutes into the workout coupled with the post-workout euphoria. I also enjoy the friendly competition in the gym or seeing one member of the community achieve a new goal, like a […]

More on predicting Regionals qualification from single Open workouts

Here is more from the brilliant, statistical mind of my husband. UPDATE –  Here are a couple of histograms illustrating the frequency of top 60 placings for competitors in a given year and region. So, an athelete, say, Emily Bridgers, completes 5 workouts during an Open. How often does she place in the top 60 during […]

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