Last week, I learned how to do a basic molecular analysis that most biologists learn to do as undergraduates: a Western blot. The general protocol is similar to that of immunohistochemistry, with the exception that more conscientious pipetting needs to be undertaken. So here is the results of my first (successful) Western, which is utilized to characterize the size of a protein(s) of interest; in this case, I was validating whether or not my clock gene (BMAL1) antibody would be of adequate use for a subsequent DNA microarray.

 

In other news, my sleep has been mildly disrupted the past two weeks by an indoor cricket that has proved to be difficult to locate and even more difficult to murder. I have read about robust circadian rhythmicity in insects in chronobiology papers and books, but now I have a first-account report of the robustness of [cricket] chirping rhythms which begins at 10:37 pm and subsides around 6:28 am. Ugh. If only I could put this cricket under a skeleton photoperiod and permanently put its chirping rhythm into an anti-phase……